Posts Tagged ‘people of color’



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Over $18,000 raised last year let’s do even more!

The Grassroot Project serves to educate at-risk youth from Washington D.C. about HIV/AIDS awareness and prevention by utilizing Division I “student-athlete” role models. Founded in January 2009, The Grassroot Project is one of the first 501(c)(3) organizations to be designed, initiated, and managed completely by NCAA Division I varsity athletes encompassing athletes from Georgetown University, George Washington University, Howard University and University of Maryland. We are also unique in our approach to HIV/AIDS prevention—instead of using a traditional education program that is lecture-based and taught by teachers or health educators, we use games that teach lessons and athletes as our messengers.


The mission of The Grassroot Project is to use sports to educate at-risk youth in the community about HIV/AIDS awareness and prevention. Our curriculum focuses on creating a fun, friendly and safe environment in which youth learn healthy life styles. The programs allow kids to share their feelings and beliefs, increase knowledge, and develop healthy attitudes and behaviors pertaining to HIV/AIDS through the use of interactive games and activities. By using the vehicle of sports to influence social change, student athletes use the curriculum to combat the high rate of HIV/AIDS in D.C

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Check out my new series that discusses HIV in rural communities. I interview individuals who are actually on the ground leading the fight against this growing epidemic in rural Virginia. Please share and spread the word!


Justin from Justin’s HIV Journal and I work on trying to find out what Black Pride means and why is it important to have a different Pride away from the Mainstream ones.


I love to blog and always jump at the opportunity to be involved with  At one point Justin and I had a conversation about working together on a project that was pride related.  We were originally going to stick with just Pride (Capital Pride) in generally; however, after Justin dealing with some of his Caucasian friend’s complaining about Black Gay Pride I knew that we were onto something.  By interviewing LGBT individuals and asking them what Black Gay Pride meant to them were able to find the driving force that keeps people coming back to DC from all over the country (and world) to attend this event.  The diverse individuals we interviewed felt a sense of community; a safe place to talk about issues specifically related to the African-American LGBT community; and the ability to be around fun and festivities.  Every person interviewed brought a very unique perspective.  The different aspects that people had of Black Pride were interesting, but summed up why so many spend their Memorial Day Holiday in the DC Area.  The many events that take place like the workshops and Health and Wellness Festival were also very popular among the attendees.  At the end of the process I realized that it is indeed important to have an overall all-inclusive pride; however, it is just as important to have prides for the many sub-groups (i.e. Latino, Black, Trans-gender, Asian-Pacific, etc).